This is positively the finest exhibition ever to be shown!

A Gold Record Listen to the song

 

Although the practice of presenting Gold Records to million-seller discs wasn't in effect in 1939, this mock-up award was likely created in recent years by a fan who wanted to commemorate Judy's best-selling 78rpm recording of "Over the Rainbow." 

The Wizard of Oz soundtrack album—first issued in 1956 in conjunction with the television debut of the film—did, eventually, "go gold" for Garland and the cast.

Judy received her own, legitimate, Gold Record in 1962 for the fastest-selling two-disc set of its time, JUDY at Carnegie Hall. Captured "live and complete" during her New York concert of April 23, 1961, the album also won five Grammy Awards (including Album of the Year and Best Female Vocal Performance). From vinyl to tape to compact disc, it has never been out of print.

 

Music Box Collection Listen

 

The Judy Doll

In 1939, M-G-M launched its own merchandising department by licensing Wizard of Oz toys, dolls, soap figures, games, Valentine cards, soap figures, and a couple of dozen other products. Since then, and especially since the film's 50th anniversary in 1989, there have been hundreds of commercially-marketed Oz items depicting Judy Garland as Dorothy, along with the other famous characters.

In the late 1930s, there were also "official" Judy Garland dresses, hats, and handbags. Her image over subsequent years has been licensed for (among other products) paint books, calendars, collector plates—and music boxes! In the photo at right, she poses with the 1940 Judy Garland doll, dressed in a replica of the finale costume from Strike Up the Band.

The music boxes above were commissioned by the Turner Entertainment Co. in the mid-1990s.

Coming soon! Judy Garland dolls—from Madame Alexander to Barbie!

 

The Judy Garland Rose

 

THE MAKING OF THE JUDY GARLAND ROSE
A stunning circus of gold and crimson! Yellow as The Cowardly Lion, the petals are stained fiery red, with shining green leaves and the innocent fragrance of apple and rose. Growers praise the shape of this Floribunda Bush Rose and its ability to “hold” on the plant, as well as when cut.

Those that were planted in the gardens outside the Gumm House succumbed to the ferocious Grand Rapids, Minnesota winter, in spite of heroic mulching efforts by all . . .

The International Judy Garland Club, based in London and in existence since 1956, campaigned for a suitable rose to be named for its star after Judy's passing in 1969. It took several years of effort, but their determination resulted in the creation of this special (and eventually award-winning) "Judy Garland Rose," delightedly dedicated in memory of the entertainer by Harkness, a famous English rose growers' association. Over the last 30 years, The Club and its worldwide membership have underwritten beds of Garland roses in many locations as a reminder for generations-to-come of Judy's incomparable legacy.

From Week's Rose Catalog:
Judy Garland (cv. HARking)
Height/Habit: Medium-tall
Rounded & bushy
Bloom/Size: Medium, in clusters
Petal Count: 30 to 35
Fragrance: Strong apple & rose
Hybridizer: Harkness - 1978
Parentage: [(Tropicana x Circus) x (Sabine x Circus) x Pineapple Poll]
Comments: Showy!

 

musical scores

 

After fifteen years and twenty-eight feature films, Judy Garland left M-G-M in 1950 and returned to her vaudeville and stage roots. Over the next nineteen years, she gave over eleven hundred theatre, concert, and nightclub performances.

Judy sang countless different numbers in these appearances, ranging from her own movie standards to classics from the Great Popular Songbook.

Her music for such shows was prepared by the best vocal arrangers and orchestrators of the day, including Roger Edens, Mort Lindsey, Nelson Riddle, Gordon Jenkins, and Conrad Salinger.

In this sequence (just click on the image), John Kelsch shows us some of Judy Garland’s annotated sheet music. In the background, you can just hear Mort Lindsey’s musicians tuning up for Act Two of JUDY at Carnegie Hall.

Her orchestras ranged in size from twenty to forty musicians. Each musician would have his own “chart” for every song in the act, marked up like these orchestrations Judy herself used when recording and rehearsing.

 

Carriage from Emerald City

 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S CARRIAGE

This hand-crafted carriage was used in "The Merry Old Land of Oz" musical sequence of The Wizard of Oz (1939).

In it, Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her friends were taken to the Oz "Wash & Brush-Up Co." to prepare for their first audience with the Wizard himself. The carriage was drawn by the famous "Horse of a Different Color."

Dating from the Civil War era, the carriage also possesses
a hand-written notation on its frame—
"A. Lincoln, June 8, 1863."

(He makes a surprise appearance in the film clip - look for him!)

A horse drawn carriage used the in the classic fairy tale starring Judy Garland, The Barouche, Civil War era. Circa 1865-1870 Brewster manufactured carriage is constructed of hand-forged iron work, they body of American hardwoods. The comfortable riding carriage features C-Springs, suspended with leather; designed with a front driver’s seat, interior Vis-a vis seating arrangement, black retractable soft top. The two large rear and two smaller front wheels are American mail hubbed; accompanied by a pole, shafts, and swaggle trees. Handwritten on one of the four wooden bows, which is the framework for the folding top, A. Lincoln, June 8, 1863.

The carriage is the first seen as the doors to the Emerald City open for “Dorothy” and “Toto”, “The Scarecrow”, “The Tin Man”, and the “Cowardly Lion”. The carriage is driven by Frank Morgan (who played Professor Marvel, the Carriage driver, doorman, guard, and the Wizard) and pulled by “The Horse of a Different Color”; “Dorothy” and friends ask to be taken to see the “The Wizard” after their long journey; but first they freshen up at The Wash & Brush Up Co.

This carriage was specially commissioned to be built and was presented as a gift to the 16th President, Abraham Lincoln from a group of New York City businessmen. It is one of three carriages known to have been owned and used by the President during the great war between the states. Collectors had been searching for 50 years when it was discovered back in the mid 1990s.  The carriage had almost headed toward oblivion!

The Lincoln carriage was owned by a Hollywood jobber who, over many years, had rented it out for use in nearly 200 motion pictures at all the great Hollywood film studios. It can clearly be seen in
"Jezebel' with Bette Davis and 'My Forbidden Past' with Ava Gardner.

HA-HA-HA HO- HO-HO AND A COUPLE OF TRA-LA-LAS
THAT’S HOW WE LAUGH THE DAY AWAY IN THE MERRY OLD LAND OF OZ
BOOS-BOOS-BOOS CHIRP-CHIRP-CHIRP AND A COUPLE OF LA-DE-DAS
THAT’S HOW THE CRICKETS CRICK ALL DAY IN THE MERY OLD LAND OF OZ
WE GET UP AND TWELVE AND START TO WORK AT ONE
TAKE AN HOUR FOR LUNCH AND THEN AT TWO WE’RE DONE
JOLLY GOOD FUN!
HA-HA-HA HO-HO-HO AND A COUPLE OF TRA-LA-LAS
THAT’S HOW WE LAUGH THE DAY AWAY IN THE MERRY OLD LAND OF OZ

 

Ruby Slippers

 

At least six pairs of ruby slippers were made for The Wizard of Oz; five are known to survive.

Place your cursor on each of the roman numerals below (one at a time) and don't wiggle it. Notes on each of the pairs by cultural historian, John Fricke, will appear.

I II III IV V VI

 

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